We Boomers are What we Eat . . .

Please consider these anti-aging food hints from biotrustnews.com:

“Reader Question:  I just turned 40 and more than ever want to do everything I can to slow the aging process.  I’ve heard about anti-aging nutrients, but I’m not sure what foods these are in.  Can you steer me in the right direction?  Thanks!

-Catherine Z., Texas

Joel’s Answer:  Hi Catherine, yes, absolutely!  If you’re in your 40s, 50s, or even 70s and want to defy each passing year while promoting more youthful hair, nails and skin, the below 7 foods will help you stock up on some of the most powerful anti-aging nutrients around.

1.  Olive Oil – Not only do the monounsaturated fats contained in olive oil support healthy arteries and a healthy heart, but olive oil also contains polyphenols, a potent anti-oxidant that may help prevent a number of age-related diseases.  We recommend organic extra virgin olive oil for the most anti-aging bang for your buck.

2.  Red Wine – That’s right, a glass of wine daily may indeed have a positive effect on your health due to its resveratrol content, a unique anti-oxidant that can help fight against diabetes, heart disease, and age-related memory loss.

3.  Beans – The unique proteins in beans thicken and strengthen your hair cells, so you can enjoy a full head of hair as you lengthen your years. 🙂

4.  Brazil Nuts – Brazil nuts are rich in selenium, a mineral which aids in the production of the anti-oxidant glutathione to help slow down the skin aging process.  Just 2 nuts a day will provide you with enough selenium to reap its anti-aging benefits.

5.  Tomatoes – Tomatoes are rich in lycopene, which has been shown to support heart health and healthy cholesterol levels as you age.  Lycopene also acts as a natural sun block to keep skin youthful and protected from harmful UV rays.

6.  Raspberries & Blueberries – These two berries contain important anti-oxidants to help offset inflammation and oxidative stress that contribute to skin aging and wrinkles.  Just one serving of either or these berries contains more anti-oxidants than 10 servings of most other fruits and vegetables!

7.  Organic Eggs – Despite the bad rap eggs get because of their cholesterol content, which is based on completely erroneous science, eggs are rich in biotin and iron which help to promote healthy, youthful skin and hair.”

Even with these great anti-inflammatory foods – active folks MAY still need supplements.

Yours in wellness,

DF

Wellness – Mind and Body

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/richard-j-davidson/well-being-skill-learned_b_7102636.html?utm_hp_ref=world

“Exercising our minds should be approached much in the same way we exercise our bodies.”

Works for me!

No negative vibes (thanks – Donald Sutherland in Kelly’s Heroes).

Control what you can for the better.

Be at peace with what you can’t control…

Weight Control Practices

Ten essential practices for Weight Control from http://weighttalk.net  fatman:

  1. Mastering the Art of Eating Well.  Learn the elements of a satisfying, whole foods-based diet.
  2. Sitting Less, Moving More. Increase your activity level and regain energy and vitality.
  3. Managing Stress. Recognize your stressors and use mindfulness to prepare for weight loss.
  4. Defeating Negative Thoughts. Replace unhelpful self-talk with a positive perspective.
  5. Gaining Control of the Environment. Modify your surroundings so only healthy options are present.
  6. Managing Time. Carve out more time for healthy eating, exercise, and sleep.
  7. Navigating Difficult Situations. Learn to make healthy choices when you dine out and attend parties.
  8. Keeping the Weight Off. Enjoy your success while upping your activity level and varying your diet.
  9. Rebounding From Lapses. Adopt the mindset and strategies that prevent minor slip-ups.
  10. Maintaining Motivation. Stay inspired by revisiting your values and rewarding yourself.

Remember, Boomers, that 2/3rds of Wellness comes from your best practices outside workout time and place.

Best,

DF

Department of Health surveys- Boomers’ Cancer and Age relationships

Three (3) links as reality checks on Big C (Cancer) prospects and what we can do to minimize our statistical chances: Cancer and Your Age

1. From NewsMax – (unconfirmed source):

“If you are age 55, you are 10 times more likely to die of cance  than when you were 35.

*             At age 65, cancer death is 20 times more likely than it was at 35.

*             By the time you reach 75, your risk of cancer death mushrooms to 40 times higher than it was at age 35.

*             And should you be fortunate enough to live to 85, your risk will be 60 times that of a 35-year-old.

This same government report says that the average age of death due to cancer is 70. Since life expectancy in the U.S. is now over 78, it appears that you can add at least eight healthy years to your life, maybe more, if you can just do one thing — avoid getting cancer.”

2. What NIH suggests:

Big “C” Statistics from the NIH

and

3. Five Signs you may get cancer

http://news.newsmax.com/?SK46Ytju0E3ZRVcOesujBOgmEYLkblRBS&https://w3.newsmax.com/LP/Health/DRB/Brownstein-Cancer-Video-V2?ns_mail_uid=96357125&ns_mail_job=1617362_04182015&s=al&dkt_nbr=73dvpgmp

In my mind – these four lifestyle and environmental factors shape these statistics:

1. sunlight (excess)

2. stress

3. smoking  and

4. our diet.

Ironically – exercise can also induce free radicals in our systems (like items 1-3) – so the importance of effective anti-oxidation cannot be overstated in my book.

Indoor Rowing!!!

Thanks to the folks @ livestrong.com for reminding folks to make good use of indoor rowing machines or ERGOMETERS.

Here’s a piece which I firmly believe to be true:
http://www.livestrong.com/article/1011317-piece-gym-equipment-youre-not-using/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=0415_m

The rowing machine. You’ve seen it in the corner of countless gyms, lonely and unused. So what is this thing? How do you use it? And why should you give this machine a try?

Bottom line: You won’t get a better full-body workout on any other piece of equipment in the gym. The indoor-rowing machine (also known as the ergometer, or erg) engages your legs, hips, core, back and arms. When used properly, you’ll get both a cardio and strength session from an erg workout.

There’s no need to spend hours on this thing in order to burn your daily calorie goal. The erg is the perfect machine to practice intervals, which can help develop your body’s ability to switch between energy systems and is an effective way to lose weight.

The erg is extremely honest. A display screen shows your power output for each stroke, letting you know exactly how efficiently you are moving and if your pace is letting up. You move this machine; it does not move you.

The Importance of Proper Form

Imagine bending down to pick something off the ground and repeating that motion hundreds of times. It doesn’t matter how heavy that item is, your body is eventually going to wear out, especially if you’re not using your strongest muscles.

Rowing is essentially the same thing, except you’re moving that item horizontally with each stroke instead of vertically. If you compromise the position of your hips and core, you will wear out those muscles more quickly. For this reason, it’s very important to use your largest muscle groups in order to produce the greatest possible power output and to protect those areas vulnerable to injury.

Tips and Drills for Getting It Right

First and foremost: Stop setting your fan to 10! A higher fan setting does not equal a tougher workout. Damper setting is similar to bicycle gears: It affects how rowing feels, but does not directly affect the resistance. A lower damper setting on the indoor rower is comparable to easier gears on a bike. Starting around a 3 to 4 on the fan will give you a great aerobic workout without wearing out your muscles too fast.

The rowing stroke is divided into two equal parts: the recovery, in which you are preparing to take a stroke, and the drive, in which you are doing the work. (When rowers are on the water, the drive is when the oar is pushing the water to propel the boat forward.)

The Recovery

The goal of the recovery portion of each stroke is twofold: to prepare your body to do the work required for the drive and to relax! Think about this: You’re spending half of your time on the erg recovering. If you can use this time to relax your muscles, you will have that much more energy to produce power on the drive.

In order to properly prepare for the drive, you want to make sure that you’re loading your muscles in the correct order. A great drill to help develop this is a Three-Part Pause Drill: During each part of the stroke, take one second to pause in the Finish Position, the Arms-Away Position and the Body-Over Position.

Finish Position: In this position, you’ve “finished” the stroke — your legs and back are straight and you’re leaning back about 10 degrees with the handle up against the middle of your chest. Pause.

Arms-Away Position: Still in the same position, release your arms and send them “away” from your body. Pause.

Body-Over Position: From the Arms-Away Position, hinge at the waist so that you’re now leaning forward about 10 degrees, arms and legs still straight.

Try to find each one of these positions while remaining loose and relaxed. As you get comfortable with this load ordering you can remove each pause one at a time until you are moving continuously through the recovery.

The Drive

The Drive is executed in the exact opposite order of the Recovery, with a focus of using your biggest muscles to create power — pushing first with your legs while holding your core stable, then adding in the rest of your body by opening your hips and finishing the stroke by following through with your arms.

One of the most common mistakes is trying to involve the upper body and hips too early in the stroke. The more skilled you become, the more “quiet” and still your body will be as you push with your legs. You can develop this skill with the Legs-Only Drill:

Sit in the Catch Position. Sit tall with your knees bent and shins vertical. Your seat should be close to your heels. Your arms should be straight out, reaching forward with wrists flat.

From the Catch, push away with your legs while holding your core tall and stable, pause, then slide back to the Catch. Your arms and back should be straight and still throughout the entire movement.

Continue this drill until you are comfortable supporting your core, then add in the remaining portions of the stroke.

So go get your sweat on and give the erg a try. You’ll be impressed at how great this machine is for giving you a full-body workout in a short amount of time.
Amen!